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RWR

Offering a continuous renewal of hope, catharsis and remembrance, and as the title suggests, a new willingness to let go, the second album by The Breath combines musical spontaneity with consummate songwriting.

The Breath 'Let The Cards Fall'

"...there is no point in holding your cards close to your chest, or hiding your various selves….this is just a document in time…" The Breath


Ríoghnach Connolly and Stuart McCallum are the creative heart of The Breath. They make an unlikely couple. Ríoghnach, known for her work with Afro Celt Sound System and Honeyfeet is a daughter of Armagh who has made Manchester her home. She has a gift for singing, a remarkable voice, a deep elegiac sensibility and a puckish, mischievous character. Stuart, by contrast, is a Mancunian urbanite who's worked with Cinematic Orchestra and is given to dry understatement and calm confidence. Both seem poised on the brink of revelation.

Let the Cards Fall is the second album by The Breath. It offers a continuous renewal of hope, catharsis and remembrance, and, as the title suggests, a new willingness to let go. Whereas the songs on their 2016 debut Carry Your Kin were honed over a number of years, Let the Cards Fall is a more organic affair. "All the material has been written at two local gigs, during three days in Hull, and in a basement in Ramsgate and a garden in Reigate," says Stuart, the guitarist/composer. It was a deliberate decision. For Stuart and Ríoghnach, writing is spontaneous and the words and music come quickly. It is part of what makes their music so special.

Ríoghnach Connolly writes the only way she knows how; a stream of poetic consciousness that addresses her great themes - diverse subjects which are all interlinked in her mind - Ireland, the pain and joy of family life, and abandoned and sacred places. "For me, the lyrics always have to speak a little truth in them. I know this is pretty, but I'm still going to get the boot in. I need that release". Interestingly, the word 'history' occurs in four of the eight songs on Let the Cards Fall.

(Antti Lötjönen uses ribbon mics made in Finland called Sandhill.)

Society of Sound members download the album here

 

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